Press Releases

October 2021

Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence hosting Annual Dia de los Muertos Tribute to raise awareness for
gender-based violence


October 20, 2021
 

DES MOINES, Iowa – October 20, 2021 – The Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence (ICADV) is hosting their Annual Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) Tribute on Saturday, October 23, 2021, in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM). The event will occur from 1-4 p.m. at La Placita, 1524 E. Grand Avenue in Des Moines

 

This year’s Tribute will include live music, guest speakers, children’s activities, Catrin and Catrina Contests, and hot chocolate and pan dulce – traditional Dia de los Muertos treats. The Coalition invites the community to join them in remembering the names, faces, and stories of individuals who have lost their lives to gender-based violence. Attendees are welcome to bring a photograph of a loved to place on our ofrenda (alter) to honor and elevate the stories and names of individuals who have been taken from their families and communities too soon. 

 

“Gender-based violence is a public health issue with serious consequences to individuals, families and communities,” says Dr. Maria Corona, executive director of ICADV. “Supporting victims of crime takes all of us, and our Annual Dia de los Muertos Tribute is the perfect opportunity for our community to come together, recognize and support the stories and experiences of individuals who have experienced violence.”

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Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence hosting Annual Dia de los Muertos Tribute to raise awareness for
gender-based violence


October 18, 2021
 

WHAT: The Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence (ICADV) is hosting their Annual Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) Tribute in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM).

WHEN/

WHERE: Saturday, October 23, 2021, from 1 to 4 p.m. at La Placita, 1524 E. Grand Avenue in Des Moines.

 

OVERVIEW: This year’s Tribute will include live music, guest speakers, children’s activities, Catrin and Catrina Contests, and hot chocolate and pan dulce – traditional Dia de los Muertos treats. The Coalition invites the community to join them in remembering the names, faces, and stories of individuals who have lost their lives to gender-based violence. Attendees are welcome to bring a photograph of a loved one to place on our ofrenda (alter) to honor and elevate the stories and names of individuals who have been taken from their families and communities too soon. Admission and activities are free, and masks are required.

Pre-registration for the Catrin and Catrina Contests is required. Please visit www.icadv.org to register.

FULL MEDIA ALERT

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Isabel Martinez Santos receives 2021 Diane Reese Excellence in Advocacy in the Movement (DREAM) Award


October 6, 2021
 

Isabel Martinez Santos, co-director of the Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence’s (ICADV) Legal Clinic and Bi-lingual DOJ Accredited representative, is the 2021 recipient of the Diane Reese Excellence in Advocacy in the Movement (DREAM) Award from the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV)

 

The DREAM Award is annually bestowed upon an individual who incorporates and demonstrates the spirit and promise of true advocacy in all aspects of their life – a person who emulates Ms. Reese’s commitment to clear and ethical communication, her eagerness to collaborate in the spirit of true partnership, and her deep respect for the dignity, worth, and humanity in each one of us. 

 

“Isabel’s outstanding commitment, passion, and bridge-building encapsulate the essence of this award,” says Deborah J. Vagins, President and CEO of NNEDV. “We applaud Isabel’s commitment to survivors, tireless work, and dedication to meaningful change. On behalf of NNEDV and the DREAM Award Selection Committee, we are proud to recognize Isabel with this year’s DREAM award and are grateful to work alongside her in the anti-violence movement.”

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May 2021

State’s decision to stop federal pandemic-related unemployment benefit program announced as Iowa is in the midst of a crisis for crime victims


May 12, 2021
 

DES MOINES – May 12, 2021 – We are deeply disappointed in yesterday’s announcement that Governor Reynolds will be ending federal pandemic-related unemployment benefit programs on June 12, 2021. These benefits have provided a lifeline to Iowans for more than a year.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has been referred to as a “great equalizer,” meaning, it can impact anyone at any time regardless of age, race, gender or socioeconomic status. But this virus has proven to be anything but this. In fact, it has exacerbated disparities within the systems individuals depend on – healthcare, shelter, food security and employment – and inequities that disproportionately impact Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) and low-income Iowans. 

 

As the state’s leading voice against intimate partner violence, we represent the collective experience of people who dedicate their lives to serving victims of violent crime. Over a year into the pandemic, our programs are seeing an influx of survivors who are reaching out for support, including access to unemployment benefits to gain economic independence. According to the National Network to End Domestic Violence, 99 percent of survivors identify economic/financial abuse as a barrier to safety and self-determination. Often times, when a survivor reaches out for help, several factors have already gone awry and unemployment benefits are not available or are very small. We know through our Match Savings Program that just a few hundred dollars can make all of the difference for a survivor. Limiting access to systems and resources that can help to curb this form of abuse causes additional stress and harm for survivors, and makes them more vulnerable to violence and unsafe situations. 

 

Today’s announcement could not have come at a worse time as we are in the midst of a crisis for survivors. Impending funding cuts to Iowa over the next two years means our network of victim service providers – including our agency – may need to reduce staff and post-crisis comprehensive services, or, close their doors entirely. As a result, 28,000 fewer victims of crime will be supported. 

 

Unemployment benefits alone will not solve the issue of financial abuse; we need long term systems change to provide economic security – increase in minimum wage, equal pay and paid sick/emergency leave – in order for survivors to build strong financial foundations. This loss of the increased benefit in unemployment is just one more blow to survivors who have already been victimized by the COVID-19 pandemic. Now is the time to expand structural solutions to address the epidemic of intimate partner violence, not discontinue vital resources that support and empower survivors in the future. 

 

In Solidarity,

Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence Staff and Board of Directors

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April 2021

Anti-violence coalitions respond to the event on April 8, 2021, at the Iowa State Capitol


April 14, 2021
 

DES MOINES – April 14, 2021 – As advocates for social change, we know that all forms of violence and oppression are interconnected and directly impact the ability of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) to be safe.

We cannot ignore the event that occurred on April 8, 2021, when a Norwalk high school student was arrested at the Iowa State Capitol as she exercised her right to speak out against numerous pieces of oppressive legislation designed to suppress and inhibit the right to free speech, enhance penalties for peaceful protestors, and extend immunity protections for law enforcement.

Video and eye-witness accounts to the arrest of the young high school student once again put a spotlight on the excessive response BIPOC receive when they gather together – even with a permit AND permission – to protest. Here in Iowa and across the country, we have seen a pattern of violence aimed at silencing BIPOC protestors that has been re-traumatizing for so many who have experienced systemic violence and inequality their entire lives. What kind of message does this send to young people about their right to speak out and have their voices heard? Are the rights of individuals to speak freely and assemble only guaranteed for certain words and certain people?

We represent the collective experience of people who dedicate their lives to serving victims of violent crime. Violence is not a single-issue problem. Systemic, cultural, and generational inequalities are root causes of violence, as well as barriers to safety and self-determination that disproportionately harm BIPOC communities. If we want to end and prevent violence, we must prioritize systems change that is rooted in equity, racial, social, and transformative justice.

We will continue to do our part to interrupt and work towards eradicating all forms of violence, including excessive force against anyone exercising their freedoms, liberties and right to demonstration. Now more than ever, it is imperative that we use our collective strength to come together and create a world where people thrive and voices are heard.

In Solidarity,

Dr. Maria Corona, executive director, Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence

Luana Nelson-Brown, executive director, Iowa Coalition for Collective Change

Elizabeth Barnhill, executive director, Iowa Coalition Against Sexual Assault and National Resource Sharing Project
 

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What is Love Art Contest launched to raise awareness for Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month


February 8, 2021
 

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month (TDVAM),  a national effort focused on advocacy and education to prevent dating violence before it starts.  It is also a time to promote safe and healthy relationships by talking about healthy and unhealthy relationship behaviors, recognizing the warning signs, connecting adolescents to support and identifying innovative strategies to prevent dating abuse. In recognition of TDVAM, the Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence (ICADV) wants to raise awareness by hosting a What is Love art contest, beginning today, Feb. 8 through
Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021.

The What is Love art contest is open to all Iowa High School students, ages 14-18. Participants can submit a piece of artwork that expresses their idea of "What is Love? into two categories: 

  • 2D Art: painting, sketch, short essay, photography, digital or mixed media 

  • Video: spoken word poetry, skit, song or short film (maximum 3 minutes)


Three entries in each of the two categories will receive a cash prize. First place will be $200 and the second and third runner up will each receive $50. All participants will have their artwork highlighted on ICADV's digital and print platforms, awareness campaigns and a variety of materials. 


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January 2021

Dr. Maria Corona named executive director of the Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence


January 7, 2021
 

The Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence (ICADV) is proud to announce that Dr. Maria Corona has been hired as the new executive director. In this role, Dr. Corona will use her extensive experience of community organizing,  advocacy and passion for social and racial justice to continue the transformation of domestic violence services and response in Iowa to create the conditions where every person can thrive. 

 

“Maria exemplifies the direction that ICADV has been moving in and continue moving towards. Her personal and professional experience provides her with a keene insight into where barriers exist and where there are opportunities to revamp and re-envision the next iteration of victim services,” says Monserrat Iniguez, chair of ICADV’s Board of Directors. “The conditions our communities exist in created a powerful leader in Maria, and I am excited to work alongside her to bring the Coalition's work to the next level.”


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